Archives for the month of: August, 2014

This poncho is extremely personalised, there is a red rose of Lancashire (the county flower of my home), a hibiscus (the national flower of my birth country), a shamrock (the national flower of my mum’s birth country), a butterfly (my daughter’s favorite insect) and Irish roses (which particularly remind me of the wonderful lady who taught me to crochet ).

image

image

image

image

image

Other flowers are found in my garden (crysanthemums, aquilegia, lillies). None of the flowers are repeats and there are 4 to 8 petalled varieties. My main challenge was making enough of a variety of leaves and these are based mainly on inspirations from fabulous Russian ladies with beautiful nail polish who have shared their skills and patterns on the internet.

image

image

image

It’s lovely and cosy warm and I got loads of compliments at my sister’s wedding 🙂

My daughter would like one for herself now, pink and pink and I’m going to be a little bit more repetitive regarding the flowers and leaves.I’ll keep the chain of flowers at the bottom and adjust the shape so that there is a point at the front and back (mine only had a point hanging down in the front, due to the use of the symmetrical trapezium discussed in earlier blogs)

Advertisements

Those of you following my exciting adventures with Irish crochet, ponchos and a 7mm hook may have also experienced the phenomenon of your children being jealous of your crochet work bag.

As posted earlier,  my daughter requested her own garden of random Irish roses and then my 7 year old (forgetting he was the recipient of the first seamless tank top /vest I ever made ) quite plaintively asked when I was going to make something for him.
So he got a Minion as he is currently loving the Despicable Me2 android app and Madeline’s doll had had a make over.
image

The doll is 12″ or 32cm and there are hardly any patterns so I ended up compromising.  The shoes are different sizes because I made them in a bit of a crochet doodle.  When I’ve had a bit of a practise (after the poncho is over) I’ll post a pattern.  Missy Miss would like more shoes in more colours. One is larger and looks less good but is easy for her 3 year old fingers to get on and off so I think the eventual pattern will be between the 2 and have a flower incorporated in the back of the heel to ease pulling on and stop the back folding in on itself when being dragged on.
The neckline of the dress isn’t quite finished either. It has to be wide enough to be dragged on so I can’t narrow it further but I’m thinking of crocheting 4 petals that overlap at the shoulders like baby vests.

image

My son got a tiny amigurumi minion from Despicable me.
image

I’ve previously posted the link to the pattern I based this on but it was slightly amended so that the eyes were crocheted (what can I say-I’m a purist)

I don’t know why I was so concerned about this part of the poncho, it’s really relaxing to do and you have to concentrate a little bit so it occupies the mind and stills the weary worries (there’s a badly remembered quotation there and the book’s not in the same country as me at the moment so you will all need to wait on tenderhooks (no pun intended m’lord ) till I can look it up and correct this blog. It’s from something Edith Sitwell quoted.

To give a basis at the bottom of the poncho, I could have made a chain of the required length… but where’s the prettiness in that? So the base of my cone (see what I did there? The trapezium has been joined at the sloping edge to make a cone so the geometrical name had to be changed to the 3D shape 🙂  ) now a lovely chain of flowers.

To start with, I tacked the flowers along the base of the cone then crocheted a filigree row basically 1 treble (US dc),4 chains and another treble (US dc) changing the treble to a double/triple, etc treble (US dc) as needed to keep the upper chain line level and take in the shape of the flowers.
image

Once I had this basis, it was essentially a case of crocheting 1 tr (US dc) 4 chain 1 tr (US dc) until I hit a motif at which point, depending on the gap to leap I used any motif linking stitch which seemed appropriate.

I usually do filigree from right to left and than turn the piece to do the next row. However the cushion’s in the way so I’ve found that chaining straight upwards is just as quick and the only thing to be aware of in making a treble is that instead of inserting the hook from front to back, it’s neater to do it back to front before collecting the third loop.

The trebles are inserted into the centre of the block below which creates a hexagonal shape. When I pin, block and iron this I will emphasize a hexagon and not a rectangle.

image

Speaking of pins, very important, can’t have too many and don’t ask a long suffering spouse to pick up a wheel at the supermarket; they will search for a long time, still not find them and return grumpy.

Pin out all the motifs at a little bit of a stretch and this evens the tension out. Don’t pin in the outer stitches you will be crocheting on but about half a stich further towards the centre of the piece. I’ve also found that 2 pins in the most central row keeps the spacing better.

For me I found that the net is never tight enough, there is a little slack required in order to actually work it and by pulling the flower petal as wide as it can be, this compensates.